Answers to Some of Your Questions About Therapy

Answers to Some of
Your Questions About TherapyMy-SF-Psychotherapy-Office

How Do I Pick the Right Counselor or Psychotherapist?
 What Can I Expect on the Phone and at the First Session?
What Happens After the First Session?
I am a Business Woman Who Travels Occasionally for Work. Can I Still See You?
What About Confidentiality?
How Much Will This Cost? What About a Sliding Scale Fee?
What About Using My Insurance?
How Long Does Therapy Take?
What is an MFT or LMFT?
How Does an LMFT Differ From a Psychologist and Other Therapists?
What is Relational Psychotherapy?
I Have More Questions.

Q.     How Do I Pick the Right Counselor or Psychotherapist?
A.     Determining whether someone is the “right” therapist can be challenging, especially if you are considering therapy during a difficult time in your life. Some things to consider:

  • Do I feel safe with the therapist?
  • Can I trust the therapist and tell her or him the things that are bothering me?
  • Does the therapist respect my confidentiality?
  • Do I feel comfortable with the therapist even if I am discussing uncomfortable feelings?
  • Do I feel like the therapist can help me with the problems I am facing?

The best way to determine whether a therapist is a good fit for you is to talk to the person on the phone and then follow up with a face-to-face meeting. Take some time during and after the call and meeting to consider how it felt to talk to the therapist. If you are not feeling comfortable, you may want to move on and try someone else, but it may also be helpful to think about what feels uncomfortable. Talking about whatever might be going on for you can bring up complicated feelings and can sometimes feel uncomfortable, regardless of the connection you have with the therapist.

Q.     What Can I Expect on the Phone and at the First Session?
A.
    Our initial phone call will give both of us an opportunity to begin to see if working together could be helpful to you. If our phone call feels comfortable, we can schedule an initial face to face consultation. Choosing a therapist can be a difficult decision, often made during stressful times. Take the time to choose someone you think is a good fit for you.

The First Session:

At our first session, I will invite you to talk about what has led you to consider therapy and what you hope to gain from this experience. There will be time for questions and for completing a small amount of paperwork. The first session will give us a sense of what it will be like to work together.

If working with me does not seem like it will help you to reach your goals, I am happy to offer referrals to other therapists and/or agencies. And if you have any hesitations whatsoever, I strongly encourage you to have an initial session with more than one therapist so that you can feel comfortable that you are making the best possible choice.

Q.     What Happens After the First Session?
A.     
Because each person is unique, what happens in each person’s experience in therapy will also be unique. In general, however, our focus will be on what is happening for you in the present while weaving in past experiences and family history. Understanding the reasons behind your feelings and actions can give you the insight that helps you to make the changes you want in order to live more fully and authentically. While therapy cannot change your past, it can help you to look at your past differently and to face today’s challenges with a different perspective.

I view psychotherapy as a collaboration between two (or more) people. I am active and engaged during our sessions and regularly invite feedback about our work together. I strive to find the optimal balance between creating a safe and supportive environment and one that challenges you to look at yourself with honesty and compassion.

Q.     I am a Businesswoman Who Travels Occasionally for Work. Can I Still See You?
A.      To get the most out of therapy, weekly (or more frequent) sessions are strongly advised. However, there are many people who have jobs that require frequent travel. While this can create some challenges for doing therapy, I am happy to speak with you about your situation to see if there might be ways for us to work together.

Q.     What About Confidentiality?
A.     
Everything that is discussed between a client and therapist is legally and ethically considered to be confidential information. However, there are some exceptions to confidentiality. Please see my page Confidentiality for more information.

Q.     How Much Will This Cost? What About a Sliding Scale Fee?
A.     My current fee (subject to change) is $150 per 55 minute session.

What About a Sliding Scale Fee?

I offer a limited sliding scale fee for daytime appointments only. I will do everything I can to work with you to find a fee that feels comfortable to both of us. Please do not let the cost of services discourage you from seeking therapy! I am happy to offer referrals to other clinicians and agencies. Please contact me for more information.

Q.     What About Using My Insurance?
A.     While insurance can be a way to help make therapy more affordable, I encourage you to think carefully about whether you are comfortable using your insurance for therapy services. In order for you to use your insurance, your insurance company will likely require that your therapist provide a diagnosis along with regular updates regarding your progress in therapy. You and I do not have control over how the insurance company may use that information, which is especially concerning in the current political environment with respect to healthcare. As a result, I have chosen not to accept insurance and to offer a sliding scale fee to people who would otherwise be unable to afford therapy.

Out of Network

I am also happy to provide receipts and “superbills” that you may be able to use to obtain out-of-network reimbursement from your insurance company or flex plan account. Please check with your plan administrator to make sure that you are able to obtain reimbursement for out-of-network providers.

Q.     How Long Does Therapy Take?
A.     The short answer is that it depends on the issues you bring in and on what you would like to get out of this experience. In some cases, people come to therapy because they need help resolving a single issue that they have already thought about and the work can move quickly. In other cases, there may be a great deal of complexity because of the number and types of issues presented, or because of the person’s history. People also seek therapy because they are dissatisfied with their lives and want to take the time to look at themselves deeply. Each person and every situation is unique.

Q.     What is an MFT or LMFT?
A.     MFT, sometimes referred to as LMFT, is the name of the license held by Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists. Although the name “Marriage and Family Therapist” suggests that MFTs primarily work with couples and families, MFTs are trained to work with individuals, couples, families, and groups. In California, a Licensed MFT is someone who has earned a master’s degree in psychology, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, or a related field, completed at least 3,000 hours of supervised post-graduate experience, and has passed two state licensing exams, some of the most rigorous requirements in the nation.

Q.     How Does an LMFT Differ From a Psychologist and Other Therapists?
A.     There are a number of different licenses for mental health practitioners, which can be very confusing. While there is considerable overlap, each license has a slightly different focus: Psychiatrists are also medical doctors, so they may prescribe medication. Psychologists have special training in testing. Social workers are experienced in case management. Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) may also provide career assessment services. MFTs focus on human relationships.

Q.     What is Relational Psychotherapy?
A.     Relational Psychotherapy is an approach to therapy that is based on the connection that is created between you and me. Many studies have shown that the theory used by the therapist is far less important than the relationship that is created in the therapy room. As a therapist, I am interactive, involved, and genuine. I don’t hide behind psychobabble. I view my role as that of a trained and experienced facilitator and guide who is committed to helping you look at yourself in new ways and create new meaning in your life.

Q.     I Have More Questions.
A.    No problem! I welcome your questions. Please contact me at 415-218-2442 or at info(at)marlacass(dot)com.